Iannis Xenakis 1975

In synchronization with
Iannis Xenakis: Composer, Architect, Visionary,
an exhibition of Xenakis' drawings, sketches, and
other visual materials at The Drawing Center
through March 2010

In collaboration with
NYU Interactive Arts

Xenakis & Friends

Music by Xenakis, Morton Subotnick, Robert Rowe, Cort Lippe, Joel Chadabe

Monday, February 15, 8pm
Frederick Loewe Theater
35 West 4th Street
New York City

Admission free

· · ·

This event is made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency. Additional funding has been provided by Amphion Foundation and numerous individuals.



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PROGRAM



Trio for Clarinet and Two Computers ....................................................... Cort Lippe / Esther Lamneck
   Esther Lamneck, clarinet

Many Times Madeleine ............................................................................................... Joel Chadabe
   Solo instrument and interactive electronics
   Madeleine Shapiro, cello

Moon on one side, Sun on the other .............................................................................. Robert Rowe
    Electronics and harp
    Rita Costanzi, harp

Intermission

Voyage absolu des Unari vers Andromède.................................................................... Iannis Xenakis
    Fixed media

The Key to Songs ................................................................................................. Morton Subotnick
    Percussion and electronics
    NYU Percussion Ensemble, Jonathan Haas, director

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS


Iannis Xenakis
Iannis Xenakis, civil engineer, architect, associate of Le Corbusier in the 1950s, is among the most radical and original of 20th-century composers. Pioneer in electronic music and in the use of stochastic processes, he is the author of Formalized Music, founder of CEMAMu (Center for Studies in Mathematics and Automated Music), and recipient of the prestigious Kyoto Prize.


Morton Subotnick
Morton Subotnick, composer of Silver Apples of the Moon, the first composition to be created specifically for release as a phonograph record, is a pioneer in developing new electronic music instruments and performing in concerts with electronics and traditional instruments. Recipient of many awards, he tours extensively throughout the U.S. and Europe as composer/performer and lecturer.


Robert Rowe
Robert Rowe, composer, researcher, works with computer sound and traditional instruments. His music is performed throughout North America, Europe, and Japan and is available on compact discs from New World, Roméo, Quindecim, Harmonia Mundi, and the International Computer Music Association. He is currently Professor of Music and Director of the Composition program at New York University.


Joel Chadabe
Joel Chadabe, composer, author, is a pioneer in the development of interactive music systems. His music has been performed worldwide and recorded on EMF Media, Deep Listening, and other labels. He is the author of 'Electric Sound', a history of electronic music. He has received grants from NEA, NYSCA, Ford Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, and he is the recipient of the SEAMUS 2007 Lifetime Achievement Award.


Cort Lippe
Cort Lippe, faculty and director of the Hiller Computer Music Studios at the University at Buffalo, New York, has worked with Xenakis at CEMAMu, Xenakis' research center outside of Paris, and used Xenakis' UPIC system in his compositions. Among Lippe's honors are the Irino Prize, Bourges Prize, and mentions at Prix Ars Electronica. His works are available on EMF Media, Harmonia Mundi, MIT Press, and many other labels.


Madeleine Shapiro
Madeleine Shapiro, cellist, concert producer, educator, and founding director of ModernWorks, performs throughout the United States, Europe and Latin America. From 1974-1996, she was cellist and co-director of The New Music Consort, which toured the United States and Europe. Her performances are available on New World Records, CRI, Mode Records, and Harvestworks labels.


Esther Lamneck
Esther Lamneck, clarinetist, winner of the prestigious Pro Musicis Award, has appeared as soloist with major orchestras, with conductors such as Pierre Boulez, and with renowned artists including Isaac Stern. She has performed throughout the United States and Europe in featured appearances at the world's leading music festivals in Spoleto and Siena, Paris, Salzburg, Mexico City, and Newport.

THE MUSIC

Trio for Clarinet and Two Computers
Cort Lippe / Esther Lamneck

This work for Clarinet and Computer is an interactive work that was created by Esther Lamneck and Cort Lippe in 2002 and is continually evolving. The improvised clarinet part is influenced and driven by the sound environment created by Cort Lippe. The electronic part was created using Max/Msp, which was originally developed by Miller Puckette, whose dedication to computer music makes pieces like this, in which the computer can truly be treated as a musical instrument, possible. The computers track parameters of the clarinet, such as pitch, amplitude, spectrum, density, rests, articulation, tempi, etc., using this information to trigger specific electronic events and continuously control the computer sound output by directly controlling digital synthesis and compositional algorithms in real-time. The clarinetist interacts with the computers, triggering and continuously shaping the computer output. The instrumentalist/computer relationship moves constantly on a continuum between the poles of an extended solo and a duo.


Many Times Madeleine
Joel Chadabe

Many Times ... (the ellipsis is the name of the performer), a series of compositions for various instruments, recitation, or voice, is based on three concepts. First, that electronic technology extends us beyond what we can otherwise do and what we otherwise are, as in this series of compositions in which an electronic instrument extends the performers into multiple sound images of themselves. Second, that the performers of these compositions are, in effect, playing an electronic instrument via the sounds they produce with their voices or acoustic instruments. And third, that an electronic instrument can seem to think for itself, make its own decisions, and translate its input into an unpredictable output, thereby providing the performer with something to react to as a cue for improvisation and interaction. I call this type of instrument an 'interactive instrument'.


Moon on one side, Sun on the other
Robert Rowe

Moon on One Side, Sun on the Other was composed for Sofia Asunción Claro, who gave the premiere at the 2007 International Computer Music Conference in Copenhagen. The piece combines a notated harp score with a computer program that accompanies the performance, applying effects processing, sound files, and compositional algorithms in real time as the piece progresses. The program was written by the composer in C++. The title comes a scene in Marilynne Robinson’s novel Gilead in which a father and son pause during their work to see the moon rising on one side of the horizon while the sun sets on the other.


The Key to Songs
Morton Subotnick

The Key to Songs is an imaginary ballet inspired by Max Ernst's novel in the form of a collage, A Week of Kindness, or the Seven Deadly Elements. The novel consists of melodramatic and often erotic illustrations which were culled from French popular fiction and then modified by Ernst, a Surrealist painter. Each of the seven chapters represents a day of the week and each day has a "deadly element" associated with it. Beginning with Sunday, the elements are: Mud, Water, Fire, Blood, Blackness, sight and Unknown.

Morton Subotnick's score, which calls for two pianos, three mallet instruments (marimba, xylophone and vibraphone) shared by two players, viola, cello and computer, provides a musical counterpart to Ernst's enigmatic collage. The phantasmagorical ambiguity between reality and fantasy in the Ernst-enhanced illustrations, and in the surreal groupings of images, has its equivalent in Subotnick's applications of electronics. Subotnick uses the computer to create "instruments" parallel to the real ones on stage. But the greatest, and most fascinating, degree of ambiguity occurs when Subotnick blends electronic instruments with acoustic ones to create new hybrids.


Voyage absolu des Unari vers Andromède
Iannis Xenakis

Commissioned by Dr. Paul Eubel, director of the Goethe Institute in Japan, for the inauguration of a The International Exposition of Paper Kites in Japan on August 1, 1989, Voyage absolu des Unari vers Andromède portrays the flight of a kite on a cosmic voyage through space towards the Andromeda galaxy.


 

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