Panel


Daniel Teruggi, Marc Battier, François Bayle


Teruggi performing


The toast

GRM at 50

Friday, November 14, 2008, 7:30pm
Chelsea Art Museum
556 West 22nd Street (at 11th Avenue)
Admission free

EMF presented a brief forum on the history, current activities, and future of GRM, followed by a concert and champagne reception to salute the 50th anniversary of the Paris-based Groupe de Recherches Musicales (Group for Musical Research), the world's first research group in electronic music. Our guests from Paris were Daniel Teruggi, director of GRM, François Bayle, past director of GRM, and Marc Battier, professor at the Sorbonne.

Listen to Daniel Teruggi speak
at Arts Electric


· · ·

Generous support for this program has been provided by The French-American Fund for Contemporary Music, a program of FACE with support from Cultural Services of the French Embassy, CulturesFrance, SACEM and the Florence Gould Foundation.

Additional support has been provided by Meet The Composer's JPMorganChase Regrant Program for Small Ensembles, Amphion Foundation, and Alice M. Ditson Fund. This event is made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency.

↓ Concert program

PROGRAM

GRM past and future, a forum with Daniel Teruggi, Marc Battier, François Bayle, and Joel Chadabe

Concert

    Birds................................................................................................................... Daniel Teruggi

    Capital Bird .......................................................................................................... Marc Battier
    Based on a text by Ariwara no Narihira
    James Schlefer, shakuhachi

    Univers Nerveux ................................................................................................. François Bayle
    In memoriam Karlheinz Stockhausen

Reception


↓ More

ABOUT THE ARTISTS


Daniel Teruggi
Daniel Teruggi, composer, researcher, director of the Groupe de Recherches Musicales since 1977, presides over the development of new technologies and creative tools for composers. His music has been recorded on European and American labels, he has written many articles on acousmatic music and spatialization, and his music is performed widely around the world. He lives in Paris, teaches at the Sorbonne, directs the research program at the Insitut National de l'Audiovisuel, and travels widely.

Marc Battier
Marc Battier, composer of electronic and computer music, researcher in the history of electronic music, is professor at the University of Sorbonne in Paris. His articles have been published in Computer Music Journal, Organised Sound, Leonardo Music Journal, Contemporary Music Review, and other journals. He is co-founder of Electroacoustic Music Studies Network, and he is on the editorial board of Organised Sound. Based in Paris, he travels widely throughout the world, presenting his music and giving lectures.

François Bayle
François Bayle, composer, theorist, pioneer in electronic music, coined the term 'acousmatic' to designate music that does not result from a physical source. His works have been performed worldwide. As director of GRM from 1975 to 1997, he presided over a major program of research, publications, concert production, and CD, DVD, and book publication. In 1974, he created the acousmonium, a loudspeaker orchestra. In 2006, he received an Honorary Doctorate at the University of Cologne. He currently lives and works in Paris.

ABOUT THE MUSIC

Birds
It has often been said that birds make music when they sing. Is it our ears that lead us to interpret their singing as music? Did the birds bring musical thought to the human mind? But whether or not we think of it as 'singing', birds produce sounds that as communications are both very much alike yet also very different. I think of these sounds as signals. And it is from these signals that I developed the musical material with which I made this work. There are few recognizable songs in Birds because I was interested more in the signal qualities of the sounds than in their melodic contour or other musical attributes. The signal qualities give us models for evolution, transition, and structure, all of which lead us to a greater understanding of what bird songs actually do.

Capital Bird
Among the poems that came out of the 9th century in the Kokinshu, a well-known and much revered anthology of Japanese poetry, many were written by Ariwara no Narihira, the great Japanese poet of the middle ages. The poem that I chose, the title of which could be translated as 'The Bird of the Capital', speaks of separation from someone far away and surprise in the sudden surfacing of a memory. In this poem, it is a bird that triggers the flash of memory and a surging pain of longing. The poem was read by Franck Royon Le Mée (1952-1993), composer and singer of a unique quality, whose voice brings out the nuanced sounds of the poem and conveys the inflections of the sentiments that the poem expresses. The recording of his performance gave me enough sound material to create all of the sounds in Capital Bird. The shakuhachi melody was composed with the collaboration of Jean-François Lagrost. The original text was translated by Yoshikazu Nakaji, specialist in studies of Rimbaud, and by Raymond Voyat, author of the novel The Ponds of Niigata. The composition was commissioned by l'INA-GRM and is dedicated to the memory of Franck Royon le Mée.

Univers Nerveux
A vibrant fabric under high tension. A cosmic space, or simply a spider's web, in any case a network, held together by lines of force. Antennae to capture weak signals. Among the parasites that arrive in a package, under pressure, an accidental form, hesitant, in the very low region. But can one call form something without form? However, it is this form which will appear throughout the piece as a question without answer. And it will appear that at sometime the reception is better, being more distinct, as if closer. This illusion lasts for a while, then tears apart, drowned in the vibrations of noise. Image or mirage of a figure born in the fever of pure movement, dissolved in itself.