Photo Collage by R. Luke Dubois


Produced by
Electronic Music Foundation
in collaboration with
NYU Interactive Arts Performance Series

Mark Hetzler
R. Luke Dubois

Saturday, February 26, 2007 8pm
Frederick Loewe Theater
35 West 4th Street

Electronic Music Foundation, in collaboration with New York University Interactive Arts Performance Series, presents an evening of multimedia musical performance. Trombonist Mark Hetzler and composer R. Luke Dubois will each perform a set of pieces for traditional instruments, electronics, and interactive video. In the first half, Hetzler performs with pianist/vocalist Martha Fisher and visual artist Katrin Talbot. Later, Dubois performs with saxophonist Argeo Ascani and flutist Natacha Diels.

PROGRAM

Mark Hetzler, trombone
Karen Talbot, live visuals
Martha Fishcer, piano and voice

"The Night in Silence under Many a Star" from Apparition.........................................................George Crumb
To work and rework to come close to intention is not experimental.........................................James Fulkerson
Wood and Stone................................................................................................................James Fulkerson
Like a Sick Eagle.....................................................................................................................Charles Ives
Arcturus.................................................................................................................................Robert Rowe
New York Requiem................................................................................................................Meredith Monk


Intermission

R. Luke Dubois, laptop, live visuals
Argeo Ascani, saxophone
Natacha Diehls, flute Biology

Biology IV............................................................................................................................R. Luke Dubois

Biology IV was written in memory of composer Jonathan Kramer. Focused around his ideas on temporality in music, the piece unfolds a biological form through the metaphor of repetition, layering, and self-similar melodic and harmonic construction.

Synaesthetic Object I............................................................................................................R. Luke Dubois

A meditation on the idea that a sound-producing system requires a body, this semi-improvised study works using a kinetic architectural construction based on a series of computer-generated surfaces. The sound is derived from a direct translation of these surfaces into an acoustic imprint of the virtual body.

Repeat After Me...................................................................................................................R. Luke Dubois

Based on a fractal and highly abstract extrapolation of John Coltrane's Ascension, this piece unfolds along multiple lines of inquiry into curvature, both in musical gesture and graphical narrative.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Collaborators Mark Hetzler and Katrin Talbot have combined numerous artistic disciplines to create a variety of multi-media productions, including Visions of America (2006) and Dynamic Elements (2007). Utilizing original images from still photography and video, the two have paired these visual elements with live music. Crafting programs of engaging musical works, the goal has always been to relay a statement to their audiences with either a theme or a set aesthetic to be explored.

In the case of Visions of America, a program of music by American composers was woven into a documentary-like presentation of interviews of Americans from all over the country. People from all walks of life (cab drivers, shopkeepers, bankers, writers, truck drivers, teachers, athletes, politicians, entrepreneurs, artists and laborers, just to name a few) are represented. These interviews explored cultural and social issues, and were then combined with historical interludes to take the concert goer on a musical journey of American life. Set to photography and video, every work on the concert had a series of images to bring about a unique interpretation of the music. Visions of America was premiered in Madison, WI and was featured on a 4th of July concert at the 2006 Interlochen Arts Festival in Interlochen, MI.

Continuing with the concept of setting images to music, their 2007 project Dynamic Elements showcases a number of stunning visuals and utilizes a great deal of technology in its musical execution. Featuring works such as Robert Rowe’s Arcturus, this concert incorporates the use of interactive computer software, as well as a host of other software programs and audio effects. This concert’s theme is the physical world as it can be seen from varying viewpoints, in time, place and perspective. The title Dynamic Elements refers to the constant state of fluidity and motion that characterizes the physical world, and looks at states of matter and many physical processes that occur over time.

Born in Sarasota, Florida in 1968, Mark Hetzler began playing his Dad's trombone at the age of twelve. He went on to receive a B.M. from Boston University and an M.M. from the New England Conservatory. Mark was a fellow at the Tanglewood Music Center and completed a three-year fellowship with the New World Symphony, under the direction of Michael Tilson Thomas. As a member of the Empire Brass Quintet, he has performed all over the world an has appeared on live television and radio broadcasts in Asia and the United States. Former Principal Trombone of the Hartford Symphony Orchestra, Mark has performed with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Boston Pops, and the Florida Orchestra. He performs solo recitals and master classes throughout the world, and recently appeared as an artist and teacher at the Pacific Music Festival and Kazusa Music Festival in Japan. Mark has released three solo recordings on the Summit record label. Mark is currently teaching as Assistant Professor of Trombone at the University of Wisconsin- Madison and is a member of the Wisconsin Brass Quintet.

Australian-born Katrin Talbot is a photographer and violist who often combines these two skills. Her first book of photographs, a photo-essay of Schubert's Winterreise, published as a coffee table book and CD by the University of Wisconsin Press, won a national American Library Association ‘Best of the Best of University Presses’ award last summer. Her photography has appeared in the NY Times and in many national exhibits in museums and galleries, and has won several national prizes, including the top prize at the Hoyt Institute National juried all-media exhibition. She has been able to combine music and photography in many ways, including performances of three song cycles with photo-essay projections. Her recent music-related photography has been used by the Metropolitan Opera, the San Francisco Opera, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, Lincoln Center, the Cincinnati Opera,the Red Hot Lava Chamber Music Festival and has appeared in many newspapers and magazines. Katrin performs viola with the Madison Symphony Orchestra, the Red Hot Lava Chamber Music Festival and the Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society.

Martha Fischer is professor of piano at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Music, where she heads the collaborative piano program. A sought-after accompanist and chamber musician, she has performed throughout the United States and Europe with many nationally recognized singers and instrumentalists. Ms. Fischer and her husband, Bill Lutes, frequently collaborate in concerts of two-piano and piano duet literature. The Washington Post described their traversal of Schubert's Fantasie in F minor as "an energetic performance bursting with heartfelt intensity." Ms. Fischer also performs as a singer and has presented unique recitals of art song in which she accompanies herself in the tradition of the French singer Jane Bathori. Ms. Fischer is an authority on the operettas of Gilbert and Sullivan, and has performed numerous G & S mezzo-soprano roles in productions around the U. S.

R. Luke DuBois is a composer, performer, video artist, and programmer living in New York City. He holds a doctorate in music composition from Columbia University and teaches interactive sound and video performance at Columbia's Computer Music Center and at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University. He has collaborated on interactive performance, installation, and music production work with many artists and organizations including Toni Dove, Matthew Ritchie, Todd Reynolds, Michael Joaquin Grey, Elliott Sharp, Michael Gordon, Bang on a Can, Engine27,Harvestworks, and LEMUR, and is the director of the Princeton Laptop Orchestra for its 2007 season. He is a co-author of Jitter, a software suite developed by Cycling'74 for real-time manipulation of matrix data. His music (with or without his band, the Freight Elevator Quartet), is available on Caipirinha/Sire, Cycling'74, and Cantaloupe music, and his artwork is represented by bitforms gallery in New York City.

 

In third grade, Argeo Ascani began playing the saxophone because of the theme song to the Pink Panther. Since then, much has happened. So far he has quit playing three times, and three times he's returned to playing. He describes himself as a classical musician, but can only think of a handful of pieces he's played that date before 1925. He realizes that nothing is ever simple in music, but honestly he walks out onto a stage with one goal: to entertain. As both a soloist and chamber musician, in venues ranging from low-bit electronic music festivals to the bright lights of Carnegie Hall, he has premiered over one hundred new works. In 2006, he joined the Music History faculty at the Manhattan School of Music as a specialist in contemporary music. Although he is one of the only saxophonists in the world actively performing on the entire range of saxophones from sopranino to contrabass, he still hasn't learned the Pink Panther.

Natacha Diels is the music director and flutist of the new music ensemble Pamplemousse. She has been involved in modern music since she knew what the term defined, and has worked in close collaboration with composers from all walks of life. She graduated with a BM in Music Performance from NYU, where she developed a strong foundation in electronics and music technology. Natacha has participated in many music festivals, including the Bang On a Can Summer Institute and Marathon; the Lake Placid Institute, and Florida’s Electro-Acoustic Music Festival. She is the curator for an ongoing new music series at the Safe-T-Gallery in Brooklyn. Outside of Pamplemousse, Natacha is involved in computer music composition and electro-acoustic improvisatory ensembles, playing with other such musicians from around the globe.